Manual The Handmade Marketplace, 2nd Edition: How to Sell Your Crafts Locally, Globally, and Online

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Auckland City, Auckland, NZ.


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Community Reviews. Showing Average rating 3. Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Feb 02, Sasha rated it liked it Shelves: nonfiction , crafts , productivity , kindle. To be honest, most of this book is written in Successful Blog Style. What is Successful Blog Style, you ask? Well, it's a style of writing that mainly says bland, incomplete, obvious things that you already know, but presented stylishly, charmingly, disarmingly and warmly.

The premise is usually something you find deeply fascinating, that fills your mind with a sense of interest, curiosity, and promise. Ultimately the Successful Blogger sells via advertising this back to you. You often learn v To be honest, most of this book is written in Successful Blog Style.


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You often learn very little, because the Successful Blogger has learned to save time by presenting less substantial content after a great header, yet it reinforces your sense of style, current or desired, often cultivating a weird new spin on the Keeping Up With The Jonses dynamic. And yet this is not a blog. It's an instructional book or is instructional not the right term? And there definitely is substance in here, especially when it comes to the really obscure aspects of selling your handmade goods, like taxes.

For other subjects, while there's an overall fluffy filler style, there's a steady smattering of real content as well, useful information and thought provoking tidbits. It may not be all that it can be, but it's a good resource nonetheless. View 2 comments. Feb 01, Eleanor rated it really liked it Shelves: grow-diy. This book is fun, easy to read and knows its audience of crafters very well. I appreciate the voices of other crafters woven into the chapters. Overall, the book emphasizes building community and your own creative practice and I think that's where the voices of other crafters really help demonstrate that this sense of community is very real.

This book has good advice for craters looking to go to craft fairs and establish and online presence, but I think the advice about taxes and accounting is r This book is fun, easy to read and knows its audience of crafters very well. This book has good advice for craters looking to go to craft fairs and establish and online presence, but I think the advice about taxes and accounting is really accessible and well presented - that may have been my favorite part of the book!

It's tough when books like this mention a specific type of technology - such as podcasts, because technology is moving so fast it's hard to know if that section won't be completely dated in a few years. I found the scruture a little disjointed - pricing your work and hiring help advice in the first section, information on selling at fairs and online in the third - but overall the book is very clear and the illustrations really add to it's fun, community feel.

I think this book is an essential companion to Craft, Inc. Feb 23, Jeannine rated it it was ok Shelves: art-creativity. Well designed book I mostly bought this because my friend Amber is quoted in it and because I loved the illustrations and design.

Recensie(s)

The information presented is great, though available in other books. This book and others like it are helpful for artisans who make things - soap, mittens, stuffies, etc - but "art" seems to require a slightly t Well designed book I mostly bought this because my friend Amber is quoted in it and because I loved the illustrations and design.

This book and others like it are helpful for artisans who make things - soap, mittens, stuffies, etc - but "art" seems to require a slightly tweaked marketing approach. I don't believe "art" and "indie" are mutually exclusive, though, and in fact would love to see more "indie" in the "fine art" scene. Anyway, if you don't have a book like this on your shelf already, this is the one you should get! Jan 30, Yulia rated it really liked it Shelves: skills-crafts.

I don't remember how I came across this book but I sell on Etsy, so I was interested to know what this book was about. It has a lot of good information, some I already knew, and some was completely knew to me. I would recommend it to anyone who is thinking about starting selling their handmade treasures or who is already doing so. Lots of great information in one place! May 03, Nicole rated it really liked it. I have a crush on everything about this book.

Jan 26, Patti rated it it was amazing Shelves: read-in I checked this out of the library, then l found it so useful that I bought it on Amazon. It is chock full of tips from actual crafters who have turned a hobby into a business. It's an indispensable tool for anyone looking to make a living creating and selling their handicrafts.

The Handmade Marketplace, 2nd Edition: How to Sell Your Crafts Locally, Globally, and Online

Thank you Kari Chapin and the members of your Creative Collective. Mar 01, Chrissy rated it it was amazing. I really found this book very useful and I am so glad I got the chance to review it. I have always wanted to learn how to list and sell my homemade crochet and scrap booking items.

This book for me was a real tool to have not only does it tell you how to it also tells you how to get set up and started. The steps she takes you threw and the things you learn in this book will most definitely help you to set up your own business. I really enjoyed the chapters on social media, blogging and marketing. I am a new blogger and my blog is only less than a year old but this was very helpful to me even for my personal blog I do. I'm not that computer smart and this is one great book that help me by the steps she lists in her book.

This also helped me understand how to set my prices when I get ready to launch my craft web site in the future. That's the hard part for me is to determine how much my afghans I make are going for and how much is to much. The Book helped me understand the wholesale and retail sales and about them. This book was so helpful to me it would be hard to list everything I loved about this book. I would recommend this book for anyone who wants to know the how to's of the Homemade market place.

The Handmade Marketplace is a wonderful resource for anyone who's thought about selling their art or handcrafted work. Kari writes in a friendly, conversational tone and guides the reader through all the ins and outs of operating a small business. A large variety of topics are discussed including marketing, branding, using social media in your business, how to take the perfect photos, selling in your community, legal details, shop policies, selling at craft fairs, and more! Included in the book a The Handmade Marketplace is a wonderful resource for anyone who's thought about selling their art or handcrafted work.

Included in the book are fun illustrations and advice from other artists and sellers. I borrowed this from my library, but I'm going to purchase a copy of my own. This isn't a book you can read once. It's something that artists will want to refer to for guidance again and again. Easily the best book I've read on selling your handcrafted work! Five stars. Mar 02, Andrea rated it liked it. This book is very approachable for those looking to take a side hobby of crafting and expand upon your opportunities. What I found most helpful were the different sites of other bloggers, podcasters, and crafty knowledge.

As a former business major it is not at all the book you should get if you want to open a brick and mortar store or if you are going to be expanding over the size of you plus one. If you are looking for something like that please instead get New Venture Creation by Timmons it i This book is very approachable for those looking to take a side hobby of crafting and expand upon your opportunities.

If you are looking for something like that please instead get New Venture Creation by Timmons it is very comprehensive. Again, this is great for marketing crafts on a small level and some good ideas. I like it enough to keep it to refer back to periodically. Jul 06, Elise rated it really liked it. This book is exactly what anyone considering a handmade business should read- it points out things you maybe neglected to realize when daydreaming about your own creative business.

To run a successful business you'll probably need to read a lot more in depth on certain aspects but this book will get creative people thinking "It's not just about sitting round being an artist"; though that's a wonderful aspect there is marketing, legal issues, accounting, and much more to think of. Highly recommen This book is exactly what anyone considering a handmade business should read- it points out things you maybe neglected to realize when daydreaming about your own creative business.

Highly recommend if you're thinking about this path for yourself. A good starting point when thinking about going into the craft-selling business. Most of it is common sense, I think, but there are some helpful hints the photography section is helpful.

It will appeal more to those who really want to eventually make this into a business, as opposed to the hobby seller like me. Some of the info I just skipped over not seeing myself podcasting. Apr 19, Jaime David rated it it was amazing. I am actually reading this book. There are no pictures or sewing projects and I will soon finish it cover to cover! It is a good reference for using modern means to market yourself and your wares.

It is inspiring. I also enjoy that there are numerous perspectives offered throughout the book, making this concept more tangible. May 28, Melody rated it liked it. Breezy, fun overview of, well, how to sell one's crafts. It covers too much to be particularly in-depth- but it doesn't claim to be. Overall it felt like a series of magazine articles, with pull-quotes and boxes of more info and quirky but engaging illustrations. I don't know that I learned anything new, but I certainly read every word. Jan 03, Sabrina Barnett rated it really liked it.

It is available hopefully today: June 11th! The layout is more like a magazine sans pictures. I love it even more when people give me money for something I'm doing anyway, so I'm always on the lookout for [I was provided with book for the price of No Monies thanks to the publisher, Storey Publishing, and the ever wonderful NetGalley. I love it even more when people give me money for something I'm doing anyway, so I'm always on the lookout for ways to turn what I'm doing anyway into monies which I can then squander on unimportant things like the gas bill.

I hoped for a book which would give me some guidance to how one goes about selling things, both online and in general. I already have some knowledge about the avenues available and I spent many a Saturday as a teenager manning a stall for my Mammy's craft business.

Read The Handmade Marketplace 2nd Edition: How to Sell Your Crafts Locally Globally and Online

I have a degree of knowledge, but it's mostly out of date. What I got was a book which was The style is initially pleasing. The writing is chatty and positive without getting too rah! Throughout, soundbites from crafters are provided and these often covered the points I felt were missing from the text. It looks quite nice too, initially. The layout suits the chatty style of the writing, but it doesn't gel enough. If you're giving me something I can't read on my kindle, I'd hope there's a reason for it. Most of the cartoon images could have been taken from a stock site - they don't have anything to do with the text.

There are a few places where some diagrams would have been useful, such as when talking about how to set up a home photography studio. I also found some of the more cursive fonts used in the quotes from crafters difficult to read which I was doing on my PC.


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Where I struggle is in knowing who The Handmade Marketplace is aimed at. These are all useful things I'm very glad to see branding covered, even if there are some massive gaps in the content, such as information about fonts and how visual identity works but for a book which has the subtitle "How to sell your crafts locally, globally, and online"?

Not so much. Branding is not the only place with gaps. There is a short section about photographing your work, which include the rather bizarre assertion that: Some cameras allow you to easily adjust the white balance, which can result in crisper, clearer photos. While it's true most cameras allow you adjust the white balance it has nothing to do with the sharpness of a photograph. White balance is the temperature of the photograph. Setting it correctly means the colours in your image will appear accurately. This can be done in camera or as part of the post processing if you're shooting in RAW which is like shooting a negative rather than a Polaroid - if you're adjusting it afterwards, shoot RAW The sharpness is effected by things like the size of the aperture which you can only control if you're using an SLR and which in turn affects the depth of field , the shutter speed, the use of a tripod etc none of which are talked about.

No tips on how to create certain looks - not even the classic "put your camera on a bean bag to keep it steady" tip.

I'd also advise making use of the 2 second shutter delay to avoid creating blur with your finger pressing the button. When it's not missing things out, it offers some pieces of advice worthy of Pippatips. In the evaluating a craft fair section, the book suggests you consider the time of year the fair takes place.

If you knit winter hats or make letterpress Chistmas, Hanukkah, or Kwanzaa cards, a show in the middle of summer might not be the right one for you. But, it also has some excellent advice which may not have occurred to anybody who's new to craft fairing, such as asking what other kind of artisans are going to be at the fair.

It does a good job of covering the very basic things you need to know and suggesting ways to research the fair, but much of this information is bogged down in the chatty style - it's not a book to reference easily. Checklists would have been a big plus. It also covers things I wouldn't have thought to cover, like what happens if you apply to attend a fair and get rejected, and I think that's probably a really good place to explain why this book doesn't do it for me.

I'm not precious in general, and I'm utterly unprecious about business things. Yes, I get the same sense of pride as anybody else putting my stuff out there into the big wide world for people to part with money for - and I'm talking about all sorts here: writing, design, illustration, craft - but once it's out there I'm done with it; anything from that point on is just numbers. Sure, it's disappointing when things don't get accepted places you thought they would, or something doesn't sell as well as you hoped, or any other form rejection can take.

There is a flipside: the unexpected joy, or more often bewilderment, of something doing better than you believed it would. Even that, though, is just numbers. When somebody tells me to give me a hug for all my hard work, especially when it's for something fundamental to the job I am trying to have, I want to respond with a Grumpy Cat gif. I particularly dislike the way the book is so firmly on the side of the crafter: it may work for you, it didn't for me.

When talking about how to deal with somebody leaving a negative comment about the work, the book sensibly advises addressing the customer's concerns, avoiding an argument, and doing so promptly. Unfortunately, it goes on to say: You come out smelling like roses compared to Ms Crankypants. Which is right up there with being thanked for a negative review so the author can show everybody how nice and great they are even though this meany-boots didn't like their book.